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Types of Surgeons

Types of Surgeons

Types of Surgeons
Transcript

There are good orthopedic spine surgeons and there are good neurosurgical spine surgeons. There are bad orthopedic spine surgeons and bad neurosurgical spine surgeons. Most of the things that deal with neurologic deficits or someone has weakness, the orthopedic spine surgeons don't want to deal with. So the evolution was is that with the original instrumentation stuff, screws and rods and scoliosis, it was originally done by orthopedists and neurosurgeons were like, well, we clip aneurysms in the head and you know, well in spine and we take care of nerf things, but if it's the bone stuff, the orthopedists do it well. As you can imagine, people don't go well. I think we'll do less things in the future. They think, well, we'll do more things in the future. And so the orthopedic spine people started fellowships and so then they did more and more and more and so now the one place where what we will do that they won't, they will, orthopedic spine surgeons will not do things that are inside the spinal cord or things, for the most part that are in the dura. The dura is the spinal fluid package that's around the spinal cord and then lower down the nerves that are the continuation of the spinal cord, like my hand ends and the fingers go. That happens right about T12 lumbar 1. And so you would, I don't know any orthopedic surgeons that will muck about much inside the Dura, for instance, like an intradural tumor or a spinal cord tumor that's in there, but a ruptured cervical disc. Sure. Or a lumbar stenosis. Sure. Somebody has got to slip. That's their bread and butter because they originally started out as instrumentation surgeons. Neurosurgeons were slow, but now you can't finish neurosurgery residency, but you know how to put in screws and rods. Most neurosurgeons, although even now, some of our surgeons are doing deformity, which is scoliosis surgery, whereas that was the, almost the pure province of the orthopedists.

Doctor Profile

Kurt Schroeder, MD

Neurosurgeon

  • Certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery
  • Chief of Neurosurgery at St. Joseph’s Hospital
  • Former Chief of Surgery at Tucson Medical Center

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